Some Zines Putting The Text In Textiles

As it turns out, when you stop publishing your own printed matter,
suddenly you start noticing a lot more all around you!

BY ZINZI EDMUNDSON

IMG_6062.JPG

A little while ago, I decided to stop releasing Knit Wit as a print publication (something I’d done for the four previous years) and move the whole thing here, to the Internet. There are many reasons why it’s been a really positive move—and the least of which was that, for some reason, once I stopped thinking in print, I started noticing it everywhere! Turns out, I wasn’t wrong when I thought that the tactile textile art forms were well-suited to print. They really are. Here: a brief round-up of my favorites of the moment.

  1. Rag Rugs by Lindsay Fout | We interviewed Lindsay for Issue 7 of Knit Wit and she was nice enough to send a bulging envelope of her printed collateral. In addition to her annual (printed!) newsletters, Fout also printed up Rag Rugs, a great, informal, introduction to anyone looking to transform their discarded clothing into beautiful new home decor. Or if you just like having something really lovely to put on your coffee table (guilty).

  2. Knot: A Book | I went to artist Lise Silva Gomes’ site to buy Craft & Practice: Meditations on Creativity & Ethics, and did, but couldn’t help checking out without Knot: A Book, as well. C&P is a deep meditation into the age-old (but currently ramped-up) conversation of “inspiration” vs. downright stealing of ideas. Knot: A Book is also a deep meditation, which is very much Gomes’ style—not only are there great explanations of how to get started with macramé and sailor’s knots, but there’s also some more metaphysical rumination about WHY to get started, too.

  3. Weaving Language II: Language is Image, Paper, Code & Cloth | Assuredly the headiest of my three picks here, Francesca Capone’s second publication under the title Weaving Language further explores her previous release (Weaving Language Lexicon, 2012) in written and woven (then photographed) form. It opened with “This essay is a patchwork,” it’s a brain adventure, I’m very into it and her work.